Rehearsal #1/Read-thru

This week at Natick Drama Workshop we got right to work.  We started off with the read-thru and ended our day with various actors learning music, dancing, and doing character work.

The read-thru is the first time our actors see the script.  It is also the first time that we have the cast “perform” together.  Sure, they’re sitting in a circle and not putting too much effort into it, but from the read-thru you can get a sense of what the final product will sound like.  It’s always nice to see our actors get into it and not just read the lines on the page. 

Our actors all worked together to learn “Twinderella” – our first ensemble number of the show.  This song will really get stuck in your head!  Other songs learned this week were “There is Love” (which was also the audition song) and “Cinderella Do This (Bob Do That)”.  Cinderella and Bob also worked on their solos in “There is Love” along with the Prince and Princess down in the music room.

Lisa was back this week and jumped right in, teaching the waltz to several of our actors.  The waltz is a big part of the ball scene and our actors need to be able to dance while singing “There is Love” so it’s good that they got started on that right away.

Any actors who weren’t learning music with Will, or choreography with Lisa were either trying on costumes or in the middle room with me (assisted by our new Production Assistant, Bella) doing character work.  Character work this early in the process consists of actors introducing their characters and telling us all about them.  Sometimes I ask questions about how certain characters get along, and every now and then I have to correct the answers given, but for the most part, actors have free range in how they think of their characters.   

Character work is really important, not just for the individual actor, but also in adding layers to our show.  For example, if all of our kid characters had the same personality, that wouldn’t be fun to watch.  So by talking to all of our “kids” we can figure out who the sassy one is, who’s curious, who’s a know-it-all, etc.  When we get into the “kids’” scene work, this will help.  This is the same for the townspeople as well. 

This also helps with characters who have very clear personalities in the script.  It’s good to talk to the actor playing, for example, the King.  He spends the majority of the play needing to have his shoes tied and being confused.  Talking to the actor about this shows that he “gets” his character and from there we can expand into relationships easily.  The actor playing the King will also have a better idea of how to approach his character when we do start to work on his scenes.

Speaking of scenes – while we were all hard at work this Saturday, Cindy was meeting with various people working on scenery (scenery-scenes – that’s my segue) and costumes.  These are things that happen behind the scenes, but are just as important to the show.  The whole show is based on the director’s vision.  So when Cindy directs actors, she is doing so with a plan in mind.  Similarly, the set and the approach to costumes are all based on that same plan.  Having Cindy meet with set and costume folks is what allows us to have the best set possible and the best costumes possible.  Now, these parents can be backstage working on various non-acting aspects of the show (that all come together during tech week) knowing that their creations will fit into the larger concept of Cindy’s vision for Twinderella.

Well that’s all from me this week.  On Saturday I look forward to seeing everyone in their mentor groups, getting to know one another and continuing to work together to put on our best show yet.

-Debbi

Auditions

Well, by now I’m sure you’ve seen the cast list for Twinderella and are hopefully getting excited and looking forward to rehearsals starting.  It’s important to remember that you won’t understand the full extent of your role until rehearsals start.  Even during the read-thru next week, some of you might not realize how much you get to do during the show until you are actually doing scene work.  So please, get excited, but if for some reason the cast list has had the opposite effect on you take heart – everyone will have a ton to do in this play.  And remember: there are no small parts, just small actors (and no, that is not a reference to our 5th graders).

Every show I try to write a blog that explains the casting process, as it is somewhat mysterious to those who have never been on the other side of the table before.  And every time I write this blog I talk about how much I love watching auditions – this is no different!  But first, a real-life Debbi-auditions story:

So this past May I auditioned for Othello with the community theater group that I’ve worked with for over 10 years.  Due to my summer schedule I put on the audition sheet that I would only do the show if offered the role of Emilia.  Usually I don’t care who I play and am willing to take any role, but with a tight summer schedule I only wanted to commit to the rehearsal schedule if the role was worth it.  For those unfamiliar, Emilia is the 2nd biggest female role.  It is not in my nature to audition for the lead, and so Desdemona was not even on my radar.

In order to prepare for this audition I had to have a Shakespearian monologue ready to go.  I had grand plans of learning something new, but found that with limited time I would have to go back to my standard monologue from A Taming of the Shrew.  I worked on this monologue, not just to rememorize it, but to bring something new to it.  I had faces that I was picturing while saying certain lines, associations that I was making to show particular emotions and I was really proud of myself.

I got to auditions, saw some friendly faces and then went in to the auditorium to audition for the director, producer, and stage manager/assistant director – all friends of mine (two of whom I had directed in the past).  I said hello, got onstage and started to say the monologue.  And then I realized that I was nervous.  Really nervous.  I did my best to stay on track, but I suddenly could not recall the faces I was supposed to be seeing or thinking of the things I was trying to think of and, although I didn’t forget the monologue, I was unable to bring to it all the emotions that I had been working so hard to muster.

And then I didn’t get the part… which was okay, and honestly, probably a good thing considering how busy I was.  At first I was really bummed though.  I thought about telling the director that I’d take any role – I just wanted to act and work with all my friends on this play.  But I stuck to my guns and waited by my phone for the news.  When the cast list was posted I saw that a friend got the role I had auditioned for and I was happy for her.  I went to see the final performance of the play and it was wonderful.  (It is possible that I would have gotten a smaller role had I been willing to take anything from the get-go, but there’s no way of knowing.)

The point of all of this is that everyone gets nervous, and you can’t always be perfect.  However, we always ask that you do your best.  When I realized I was nervous I didn’t stop.  I kept going and I did my best to hold on to the emotions I had.  When it was over I smiled, thanked my production staff friends and headed out of the room.  I saved my disappointment until they couldn’t see my face.  At Natick Drama Workshop though, things are much different.

First of all, everyone gets into the play, so you don’t have to be nervous about that.  Second of all, you don’t have to prepare anything ahead of time, which means no memorization.  And third, everyone has had the same level of preparation, meaning that no one has an advantage over anyone else.  Additionally, because everyone is doing a cold reading (a monologue given at auditions for auditions), no one has the chance to do a ton of work, so you just do what you can do and make the best out of it that you can. (By work, I mean preparation.)

And that’s exactly what everyone did at NDW this past Saturday.  And that is why I love auditions so much.  It’s especially great to see how our returning actors have grown since the last show (talent wise, as well as in terms of height and confidence), but it’s also nice to see what our new cast members are going to be adding to this program. 

And then, at 12:30, all of our actors get to relax and it becomes the staff’s turn to sweat.  Casting can be fun, but it’s not always easy.  It’s a puzzle, and this puzzle of 60 actors felt more like a 1000-piece puzzle at times.  Why?  Because everyone’s so talented!  And we want to make sure that each role matches the actor.  We don’t want to give anyone a role that they can’t handle.  That being said, sometimes we give out roles that are a bit of a stretch, knowing that the actor can handle it.  

The really tricky part is when you have several actors who can all play the same few parts.  That’s when you have to really batten down the hatches to figure out how best to cast people.  At that point, sometimes it ends up being about the actors around them.  For example, if we were doing Bye Bye Birdie and had 3 actors who could easily play Conrad, Albert, and Hugo, sometimes you have to look at the other actors that have already been cast.  Or sometimes, it comes down to something as simple as vocal range.  I mean you can’t cast a bass as Randolph MacAfee – you know?

Okay, so going with this example you have actors A, B, and C who would all be equally fabulous as Conrad (the teenage heartthrob of a singer who has to kiss Kim on live tv), Albert (the lead and a romantic interest to Rosie), and Hugo (a love struck and jealous teenager, dating Kim).  So what do you do?  You’ve already talked about who has the most swagger, who is best at playing awkward, and who could most easily carry the show, but all 3 actors are pretty even in each category.  So now, you look at the actresses playing Kim and Rosie and figure out if maybe Actor A works best with one of those actresses.  Or maybe, one actor doesn’t seem ready to pretend to be in love onstage (I mean all of our actors are in middle school after all).  If that’s the case then that actor might be better suited to be Conrad.  But then again, the person playing Conrad has to be able to flirt with every girl on stage.  (We really do try to look at every angle while casting.)  Well, then, maybe that means that Actor C, who always seems to be comfortable around girls gets the part.  If so, that means that the roles of Albert and Hugo could go with Actor A or B, which is somewhat more helpful. 

Now the problem is that you have two actors vying for the lead and the (something like) 4th best male role in the show.  If both actors are equally talented how do you decide who gets the lead and who doesn’t?  Is it fair for one of those actors to have a smaller role, even though you know he could handle the lead?  Well this is where the whole “no small roles, just small actors” thing comes into play.  After all, a good actor can turn even the smallest ensemble role into a scene stealing opportunity.  And realistically, both these roles are still good.  Even if Hugo isn’t the lead, it’s a great part to have. 

Okay so you’ve gone over everything over and over and over again.  You look at the music to see if one actor would be able to better sing one of the roles.  You look at the surrounding cast to figure out if one actor would work better with the Kim actress than the Rosie actress.  You talk about the actors’ individual personalities and how they’ve taken direction in the past.  You compare dancing (Albert does have to be the better dancer after all).  Finally, you make a decision.  You decide that Actor A will be Albert and Actor B will be Hugo.  It’s not a reflection on Actor B that he didn’t get Albert, but rather a decision based on the whole picture.  And in some cases, it’s possible that Actor B got the role of Hugo because he’s so good that the directors know that he’ll make the most of it. 

Either way, this is when casting gets stressful.  At the end of the day though, a beautiful cast has been assembled, with everyone getting a part that will allow them to shine.  The wonderful thing about this program is that we really do put a lot of thought into casting.  In adult theater, if you had 3 actors vying for 1 part, chances are 2 of them won’t get cast as all – even though all 3 are wonderful actors.

Having said all of that, I’m glad that the cast list is done and that it is up on the website.  I can’t wait for our cast to assemble for our read-thru this coming Saturday.  And I am very much looking forward to seeing all the work that our cast will be putting into this incredibly fun show.  I love this show.  I love the story, I love the music, and I love NDW.  So let’s get this party started already!

Until Saturday,
Debbi

Preparing for Auditions

Hello everyone and welcome back to Natick Drama Workshop!  This blog is an edited version of a past post.  If you read it before I strongly suggest reading it again before Saturday!

In a little under a week we will be back at NDW for the spring show and I thought that perhaps it would be helpful to write up some audition tips to help both our new and returning actors get ready for our spring musical (no, I can't tell you what we're doing, but you will be happy).

Tip #1: Have the right attitude.  Smile and be polite.  
What does that have to do with acting?  Nothing really, but whenever you audition, interview, or are trying to make a first impression you should always make people think that you want to be where you are and that you're happy and excited.  If you get nervous it helps to remember this, so that you can get over some of your nerves by acting like you're happy.  And when you smile, your mood can change!
Cindy, Lisa, Will, and I notice when you look unhappy or when you're not polite.  So put your best face forward, behave and say please and thank you!

*In the past there were a few 8th graders who did not do this and it did affect how we cast.  I'm not telling you this to call anyone out, but rather to encourage everyone to remember that how you present yourself during auditions matters.  In the fall the attitude presented by these people filtered down to the rest of their auditions.  That is why this is #1 on my list!

Tip #2: Smile while dancing and keep on moving.  
This one sounds like the last one, but is more specific.  When you do the dance audition you might not remember all the moves, or you might mess up, or maybe you just aren't the best dancer.  That' okay.  What we want to see is someone who can move and act their way through the dance combinations.  Obviously it helps to be able to dance, but it's not completely necessary to have a good dance audition.  Pretend that you are at your dance recital and smile like your grandparents are watching and then relax.  Do your best and don't freak out or lose the smile if you mess up.  Sometimes we see someone who doesn't do all the dance moves, but keeps smiling and bopping along and we know that there's something we can do with that person that will feature him/her.  Plus, it means you have a good attitude and that is a must for all theater endeavors!

*Additionally, think about it this way - during the performance what do you do if you suddenly forget part of a dance?  You don't just stand there looking miserable.  You keep on smiling and do something subtle until you can pick up the dance again.  Think of your audition like a performance and improv your way through it if necessary.  Of course, by the first performance I know this would never be an issue because you've been practicing your dances for months...

Tip #3: Act your song and sing it loud and proud.  
While I'm being specific, let's talk about the music audition, which tends to be the scariest.  When I was in NDW it was the scariest part for me, too.  Believe it or not, I was a quiet kid and didn't always project during my singing auditions, but I wish I did.  Here's the thing - your singing audition is also an acting audition so we need to hear you, even if you're off key.  We also need to see you do more than just stand there with your arms at your side or crossed in front of you.  We know your nervous and that's okay, but please do your best to show us that you care.  What is the song about?  Can you put in a dance move or a gesture that will show us that you're invested?  Can you assume a character or an attitude to help get the point of the song across?  At the very least - smile!  And don't forget to project.
Tip #3a: Sing by yourself.   Yes, you are allowed to sing in a small group of 2 or 3, but sometimes that means that we can't hear you at all.  If you are in 7th or 8th grade, specifically, just try to sing by yourself.  That way, it is easier for us to cast you whether you are the best singer in the cast, the worst, or somewhere in between.  

*I would like to add a non-theater story here.  Despite having done musical theater since elementary school, I was really nervous the first time I did karaoke by myself.  I picked "Goodbye Earl" by the Dixie Chicks as my first song and was literally shaking from the time the song started to the end.  How did I get through it?  Well, I acted the song out as I went.  I turned it into a story and I smiled.  Now, I'm much better at doing karaoke because I got my jitters out by acting and hamming it up.  Why don't you see if you can act through your nerves as well?

Tip #4: Make choices and commit to them 100%.  
When you act you have to make choices.  We go over this at auditions, but sometimes I'm not sure everyone understands.  And more importantly, this isn't just for the acting audition.  It is also for singing and dancing, but I will speak here about making choices in terms of the acting audition.  You need to decide what to do.  How will you say a line?  Is there a word that you want to emphasize more than another?  How will you use your face?  What gestures or body language should be used to convey your choice?  Do you need to use a certain tone or inflection with your voice?  As an actor this is all up to you.  During the rehearsal process the directors help with these choices, but during an audition it is for the actor to make decisions in a way that will help to showcase his or her individual talents.
The worst thing you can do is nothing.  In doing nothing you are making the choice to show us that you don't care.  Now maybe you are shy or don't know how to make certain choices - fine.  That is totally understandable, but if you don't try something your audition falls flat and it becomes very hard to cast you in the correct role.  It is better to try something, commit to it 100% and have it fail, than to make the choice to do nothing.

*Remember how I mentioned that some 8th graders didn't do so great with #1?  Well those same actors didn't do so well with this one either.  They chose to not have great attitudes and that was the entirety of their auditions.  The two are always connected.

Tip #5: How you stand matters.
I've already talked about presenting yourself and making a good first impression, but I haven't mentioned stance specifically.  Unless you are making a character choice (see above) you should be standing up straight.  No slouching, no leaning, no going back and forth from foot to foot.  This isn't easy because we are all hardwired to fidget, especially in situations that make us nervous.  This is something you can practice on your own.  In your room stand with your feet shoulder-width apart and plant your feet (actually imagine that they are planted or superglued to the ground).  Put your hands by your side and have a conversation with your imaginary friend (or better, invite a friend over and you can have someone to talk to and call you out on your fidgeting).  Once you've mastered this you can try standing like different characters and practice what it feels like to slouch on purpose!

Tip #6: Enunciate!
When you are speaking, whether as part of your acting audition or when you're introducing yourself to us, make sure you can be understood!  Speak clearly and slowly.  Make sure we hear your consonants!  

On that note I leave you.  I look forward to seeing you all at auditions.  Good luck!

-Debbi

Rehearsal #10

This week’s rehearsal was… interesting… Well, let’s just say that our actors found out what it’s like when their fellow actors don’t know their lines.  Normally I would sugar coat this a little bit more and write a blog about memorization techniques, but I’ve already written that blog.  So instead, I’m going to give you the truth – this week’s rehearsal was painful.

However, there were some bright spots.  Certain actresses knew their lines and should be role models for everyone else.  Lady Merle and her Ladies knew their lines, as did Maid Marian, Bridget, and Annabel, as well as the Sheriff’s Wife and Daughters.  Thank you to those of you who were on it.  There were a few others who seemed to know what was going on – thank you if you were one of them.

Now, let’s put that behind us, and focus on the positive, shall we?  With all the time that we’ve had to get this show ready I think this is the first time in years that we’ve been able to do character work with every single actor.  That’s pretty amazing with a cast of 79.  Now is the time to start putting that work together with the lines, blocking, and choreography.

What do I mean by that?  Most professional actors will tell you that a lot of work goes into each performance.  Most professional actors do prep work when they get a role and put notes in the script about their characters’ motivations and objectives (what they want and why), as well as things like beats (natural pauses), memories, relationships, and back stories. 

Let’s say that I’m playing a villager in this musical and I have my one line, plus various ad-libs throughout the play.  My villager (and I’m making all of this up in an effort to not take an existing character) is named Gwendolyn and she is a cobbler (shoe maker).  My line is, “The Sheriff is the one robbing us blind.”  (Again, that line is not in the script, I’m making this all up.)  From that line I know that I have very little money.  Because I’m a cobbler I know that I work with my hands and with leather from animals.  Perhaps I can no longer afford to buy the leather I need from the tanner (someone who prepares the leather).  I’m now going to have to take the cow I own and use it to create the leather I need to make shoes, which will mean less milk for my family.  Of course, in order to sell shoes, someone has to buy them from me and money is scarce all around.  So at the fair, when I see the golden arrow, I day dream about what it would be like to win the archery contest and the arrow, but I know that I would never actually win, so instead, I want Robin Hood (well, Cedric) to win.  That way, at least the Sheriff’s man doesn’t win the golden arrow.  My character is invested in the archery contest for this reason.  That is why Gwendolyn pays attention, and why she cheers and boos when she does.  This is also why she decides to join Robin’s merry band.  She can repair his shoes in exchange for food and shelter, while sticking it to the Sheriff.

Now this is just a small piece of the work that many actors do to prepare for their roles.  You may think that you don’t need to do any of this work because you have a small part, or because acting comes easily to you, but none of that matters.  A true actor knows his character inside and out and has a reason behind all of the actions that a character chooses to take or not take – even though the actor is not the one who wrote the script.

So, I challenge you.  As you continue to memorize your lines (and re-memorize them), review you lyrics, blocking, and choreography, take a minute to figure out why your character is doing or saying something.  You can’t use the excuse that “that’s what it says in the script” or “Cindy/Debbi/Lisa/Jane told me to do it this way.”  See what you come up with.  Giving your character purpose is extremely rewarding and will make your performance that much more believable.

See you Saturday,
Debbi

Rehearsal #9

I hope everyone had a wonderful Easter and Chag Sameach to those still celebrating Passover!  Having a week off from NDW was weird!  Maybe you didn’t notice, but I did.  Saturday seemed much longer to me.

At our last rehearsal our actors did a lot of everything while also getting in and out of costumes for our Debsan Window Photo Shoot.  (Doesn’t it seem more fancy when every word is capitalized?)  I can’t wait to see how these pictures turned out.  I know that many of our actors weren’t at this rehearsal, but fear not – you’re turn is this Saturday. 

I’m always amazed by how time moves.  Just a couple weeks ago it seemed as if we had a huge amount of time left to rehearse.  Yet, when we return on Saturday we’ll be less than a month out from our show.  That’s right, we have 4 Saturday rehearsals left.  That’s it.  Now the good news is that all the music has been done and our basic blocking (or first layer of blocking), at least, has been done for all but the last scene of the show.  Choreography is moving along, and will continue to do so now that Lisa is back, and almost all lines will be off-book (right guys?).  So why do I feel like time is running out?  Because it is.  There’s still a lot of work that needs to be done.

In addition to blocking the last scene, almost all of the fights need to be blocked, the fair scene is still a work in progress, and not all the dances have been learned.  Can we do this is 4 weeks?  Yes – if everyone cooperates.

Now let me tell you all a story.  Last year I directed, choreographed, stage managed, produced, etc. a play for the school where I work.   The cast was made up of 15 teenagers from grades 5 through 8.  And they were awful.  They talked, they didn’t listen, and it was super challenging to teach the boys how to do a jazz square (something I take for granted at NDW).  On top of all that, because of the way the school and our venue had to schedule things, we only had 1 true tech rehearsal.  I told my parents not to bother going to the show (granted, they wouldn’t have anyways, as I work over an hour away from Natick) and I was sincerely afraid that my boss would see the show and decide not to rehire me.  That’s how bad it was.  I worked Memorial Day weekend (and Memorial Day) painting the set, as I couldn’t get any help from the school’s art teacher, let alone any one else.  I was prepared for this show to be a disaster. 

At some point, these awful students (who are great individually in a classroom setting) realized that they were going to have to do this in front of the entire school and their families and decided to take the show more seriously.  Did rehearsals go smoothly at that point?  No.  But they started to be a little bit better.  I did have one girl who kept asking what would happen if she got sick and couldn’t do the show (her family allowed her and her brother to be “out sick” the day of the chorus concert so that they wouldn’t have to participate).  In my head I was thinking that I might have to prepare to go on stage to take over her part.  I truly believed that she might not show up.  Luckily, the rest of the cast talked her out of it.  They may have been forced to do this show, but they understood the importance of it.

We got to our tech rehearsal and it went pretty well, all things considered.  The person running lights and sound had no idea what was going on despite having had a script for months (because she was also the musical director), and lines were skipped, but we had a show and I could finally relax a little bit.

Then it was show time.  The kids thought they did an awful job, but they pulled it together and I thought, considering what we had all gone through, that it was great.  The next day they did an in school performance and it was even better – and they all felt really good about themselves.

So, why tell you all about this awful experience?  Because, no matter how little time there is, no matter how much work still needs to be done, I know that if I was able to get those kids to pull off that show, that we can do everything and anything.  Seriously.  We have 4 weeks, plus 5 tech rehearsals.  We have behind the scenes people who know what they are doing and want to help out.  And more importantly, all of our actors want to be in NDW and are invested in this show. 

So no matter how much time we have left, I know that with a little hard work and a dab of theater magic, 4 weeks is plenty of time.

See you all Saturday,
Debbi

Rehearsal #8

This week at NDW we started off the day by singing all of the Act 2 songs with Jane.  Our cast is starting to sound good – our actors just need to memorize those lyrics!  Lisa was back, so many in our cast were dancing once again while others reviewed blocking. 

All of Act 1 is now off-book and actors learned the Entr’acte blocking just in time to have that scene memorized for next week.  We also delved more into Act 2, Scene 1, which is good because that scene is also off-book next week.  Additionally, after working on blocking for “Help is On the Way!” I was able to teach fight choreography to our Robin Hood and Friar Tuck for their big fight in Act 1.  We are definitely moving right along!

With all of the snowstorms this month, we have been so lucky to not have missed a single rehearsal due to snow (I hope I didn’t just jinx us).  What do you do on snowy days?  I shovel, but that’s not all I do.  I read, I make hot chocolate, and I have a tendency to binge tv shows.  I like to watch old shows that I’ve already seen so that I can easily multitask.  Even when I do this, there are certain performances that cut through all of my Candy Crush-ing and grab my attention (even if I’ve seen the same thing 10 times already).  Why do these moments, these performers, grab my attention?  Well, their superb acting of course!

Whenever this happens and I get lost in a performance, I find myself thinking about it afterwards.  I think about what was so special, and if there’s anything that I can learn from it.  This varies from show to show and actor to actor, but the biggest thing is that I believe the performance.  I believe it to the point where it stops being performance and it starts to be more like watching life unfold.  Even on shows where ghosts and vampires roam, if the actors are doing their jobs right I get so immersed that I see past the supernatural plot and it doesn’t matter if ghosts are real or not.

So what exactly are these actors doing to make their performances so real?  I’m sure that there are many answers to this question, but I’m going to answer that they, the actors, believe that what their characters are going through, and that what they are thinking, is real.  If you want to know if an actor is good, watch his or her eyes.  The eyes should tell a story.  Not just in terms of if their eyes look sad when they are sad, but if their eyes are seeing things.  When a person, a normal everyday person, remembers a past event, the memory comes through the eyes.  Think about it.  Watch someone try to remember something.  You can see how hard he is thinking and you can tell when he grabs onto part of a memory.  It’s like how you smile when you think of something good that happened last week, or last year.  Actors who are really good are constantly doing this, too.  The backstories they craft for their characters help, but if an actor doesn’t use her backstory while acting, the performance can come across as hollow.

Okay, so why am I telling you all this?  For two reasons: First, as actors, it is important to appreciate the craft.  The next time you’re watching a tv show or a movie, stop and watch the actors’ eyes and appreciate all the work that goes into making their characters believable.  And second, so that you, as actors, can improve your craft. 

When you are at NDW, think about what you’re saying, doing, hearing (when other characters have lines your character would be listening to them, right?).  For example, in the very first scene, those characters in Sherwood Forest when the caravan horn sounds – how do you know it’s the caravan?  Have you seen a caravan before?  If so, what did it look like?  Who was in it?  How much money did you get from it?  Answer these questions for yourself and then see it in your mind’s eye.  This will then come out through your real eyes!  Or think of Friar Tuck when he’s thinking of food.  Of course he’s picturing the food in his mind’s eye.

Another example would be when Robin and Marian realize that they knew each other as children.  For our two actors, maybe they can picture what the other looked like as a child (which shouldn’t be too hard as our actors are far less removed from childhood than the characters they play).  Maybe there was a game Robin and Marian played or a place they used to walk.  If our actors picture those things, the relationship between the two will feel more real.  And it doesn’t have to be the same thing for both actors. 

There is another way to go with all of this of course.  Instead of making up images, use images from life.   When you’re at the fair, singing about all of the wonderful things that are there you can think about that time that you went to a carnival, or to King Richard’s Faire, and use those images.  Those real-life memories can transport your character to a more believable place, too.

So, having said all of this, remember that acting is in the eyes.  Try it.  Or, at least, try looking for it.

Until Saturday,
Debbi

Rehearsal #7

Man is it snowing outside!  I hope everyone is enjoying (or did enjoy) your snow day.

How did your first off-book date go this week?  For many of you it went pretty well.  For a few of you, it could have gone better.  But guess what?  That’s what rehearsal is for.  Just don’t forget that you have to do work outside of rehearsal, too.

We did get through the entire first scene pretty successfully this week, without the script.  While doing that I made sure that everyone knew who they would be fighting in that scene and when they would enter to do so.  When I actually teach the fight choreography the spacing will work itself out.  Also of note this week, we finished blocking the end of Act 1 (minus the fair “business”), which is perfect because this coming Saturday, everyone must be off-book for the rest of Act 1 (scenes 2 & 3).  One more act to go and we’ll be all set!

And more importantly, we had our canned food drive for the Natick Service Council.  This is something we do during each show and it’s really important.  Natick Drama Workshop is all about community, so it’s good to give back.   As we said at rehearsal a couple of weeks ago, by bringing in canned goods we are giving back to the community that supports us.

NDW has been around for a long time.  When I was in 8th grade we were celebrating our 35th year.  That was over 20 years ago!  (Yes, feel free to do the math now to figure out how old I am.)  This theater program has been part of the community for a very long time.  We’ve had directors and musical directors that taught in Natick public schools.  We’ve had several staff members who grew up in Natick.  We’ve also had some children of NDW alumni go through the program. 

For me, NDW gave me a new community.  There are kids that I would not have talked to in high school (and who wouldn’t have talked to me) that I was in NDW with and guess what, we talked, and still do to this day (thank you social media).  I can reach out to someone who went through this program and we immediately have something to bond over because of NDW (like Mr. Rufo at the high school).  But our community is so much bigger than that.

NDW is community theater at its best.  Yes, it’s a workshop, but you’re doing theater because you love it, period.  And that goes, not just for our actors, but also for our NDW parents and our alumni that keep coming back.   We have so much fun in the gym every Saturday, but there are so many others involved in this show who help out because they want to (and because their kids are in the show).  There is a huge sense of camaraderie that exists beyond the gym and friendships that are made between the adults behind the scenes.

I’m proud to work at Natick Drama Workshop.  I’m also proud to be an alumna (can I just be the NDW poster child already?).  Even on the worst Saturdays, when we can’t get our actors to be quiet for more than two seconds (yes, that is every Saturday lately), I’m so happy to be at Cole with all of you and to be part of this wonderful community.  And I love going to see high school shows, starring many past cast members (sometimes directed by, or even written by, our alumni). 

Each mentor group that our actors have is like a mini community, and it changes up each show.  I have heard such great stories from alumni who talk about their experiences with mentor groups as 5th graders and how that led to them treating others when they were in 7th and 8th grades.  This program didn’t exist when I was in NDW, but I’m so glad that it exists now.  What other program forces you to get to know your fellow castmates (or teammates) in this way?

Everything that NDW has become has enriched our role within the community by being the best community we can be at Cole.  Why not take that and spread some of our love to the rest of the Natick community?  Without Natick’s love and support for the past 50 plus years we would not be here.  So as you use the snow day to go over your lines and sing your songs and review your choreography, remember that what you put in you will get back.  And the more you put in, the happier you will be because you’ll be able to come here Saturday morning with confidence.  That will allow you to just relax and enjoy the wonderful community we have all built together.

Until then,

Debbi

Rehearsal #6

It’s nice when we get a chance to run scenes with music from the beginning through to a certain point.  That’s what we did this week.  We ran from the Prologue to what’s been blocked in the fair scene.  Jane also went over all Act 1 music.  That means that we’re really close to being done with Act 1!  Which is good, because this coming Saturday is our first off-book day in which everyone must have the entire first scene memorized.

As an actor, when you’re off-book, everything gets easier (assuming you know your lines and blocking).  When you can put down your script you can start really inhabiting your character.  No longer do you have something in your hand blocking your gestures, preventing you from dancing, or getting in the way of a good sword fight.

The flip side of that is simple: script in hand means that you are using a crutch.  It will take you longer to memorize lines, lyrics, blocking, and choreography.  Hopefully everyone’s been working on these things, but let’s say that you haven’t been.  Well, the next best way to work on it is to be forced to put your script down and figure it out.  Of course, this is painful for everyone else.  Imagine that you’re at rehearsal and you don’t have as many of your lines as memorized as you would like.  But you want to try – that’s great, and I urge you to do that.  However, the longer it takes, the more annoyed others get and the less patience others will have with you.  That is why this step must be done on your own.   Find someone to run lines with and do your best with them holding the script, rather than waste your fellow cast members’ time during rehearsal.

Here are some memorization tips:

1) Write your lines down.  I like doing this at the computer, but pen and paper work just as well.  You don’t even have to say your lines out loud, just write them down, in order.  Of course, in order to do this, they do have to already be at least mostly memorized.

2) Grab your script and test yourself.  Pick one line at a time to work on and repeat it at least 3 times.  Then say it without looking at your script.  Then put your script down and repeat the line another 3 times.  If you forget, or mess up, start again.  As you add lines, go back and say them all together.  For example, if your first line is, “Why, hello sir” and your second is “That’s my hat!” after you have both lines down say, “Why, hello sir.  That’s my hat!” over and over again.  Then add another line.  Once you can repeat all of your lines together at least 3 times you’re in good shape.

3) Find a scene partner.  This can be a person or an app.  I can’t speak to the app bit, but I know that there are plenty of apps out there to help you memorize your lines.  They may cost money though, which is why an actual person is always better!  Give your scene partner the script and have them read the lines that aren’t yours.  Tell them ahead of time how much help you want.  Do you want them to wait 5 seconds and then give you a word?  Do you not want any help until you say the magic phrase (which you make up on your own)?  If you do need help with a line, don’t just have them say it and move on.  You must also say the line in order for it to sink in.  This is also a good strategy for after memorization…

4) Find a scene partner – take 2.  Maybe you’ve memorized your lines, but you need to better learn the lines that come before yours (this is actually super important).  Have someone on book, reading those lines to help you.  The more you hear them, the easier it will be.  Also, sometimes you know your lines, but mix up words or keep changing little words here and there.  A scene partner can let you know when and how you are messing up so that you can fix it and get your lines down perfectly.

5) Sing in the shower.  You know your songs, why not sing them in the shower, where acoustics are great and you have some privacy.  I do not recommend dancing in the shower, however.

These are just some tips.  When I’m in a show I like to repeat my lines to myself while I drive.   None of our NDW actors can drive, but you get my point. Basically, I just try to find some alone time to commit my lines to memory, but everyone has a different style.  Once you find your style, it will become that much easier!

Whatever you choose to do – be prepared.  Don’t wait until Friday night to memorize your lines and once you have them, keep working on them.  The easiest thing to do is to forget.

See you Saturday,

Debbi

Rehearsal #5

We had a productive week at NDW.  Lisa went over the “Merry Life” dance while Cindy and I went through blocking.  We are in the fair scene!  That’s huge – that’s scene 3 in a show where Scene 1 might as well be worth 3 scenes all on it’s own.  Now the fair scene is also a really big scene, and as the weeks go on we will have to layer it.  It would be impossible to give the actors all the blocking for that scene at once, so it’s great that we started it.

Cindy also went over the Entr’acte with members of our cast and I did more fight choreography, giving a huge tutorial on fighting with quarterstaffs, which is something we only get to do when our play is Robin Hood.  And of course, there was time for some improv as well!  Late for Work is always a fun game to play.

One thing that I want to talk about this week is complacency.  Normally, our tech week would be about a month away and we’d be two more rehearsals into the show.  This time around, we have 2 months until tech week, which more than makes up for starting 2 weeks later than usual.  However, this is the time when all of us, directors, actors, parents, need to realize that we still need to go full steam ahead, despite the fact that it feels like we can relax.

Compare this show to the fall show.  We had somewhere around 8 weeks to pull the whole thing off.  That’s about the amount of time left to rehearse Robin Hood.  The staff picked Mirror Image because we knew we could get it done in a short rehearsal period and that costumes and the set would be relatively easy to pull off in that amount of time.  So all of us are thrilled to have so much more time this spring to work on our show.

However, this is when we get in trouble.  While it’s great that we’re into the 3rd scene and all the music’s been learned, there’s still a lot to do and a lot to fix in the blocking that’s already been done.  We need to forge ahead, but it’s easy to forget that when there is so much time left.  This works for lines, too.  Our actors may be thinking that they don’t need to start working on memorization yet, especially with other school plays coming up sooner and other activities, in general.   This line of thinking is a mistake.

Trust me, this play will sneak up on all of us if we aren’t careful.   In fact, I can’t believe that March starts this week.  Where did February go?  Forget February, where did January go?  Before you know it we will be in April and will have a week off from NDW for a holiday break. 

Having said all this, what can you do to prevent us from becoming complacent and to help us all be ready come tech week?  That’s simple.  Don’t take the time we have for granted.  Start working on your lines now.  Make sure everything gets done before it’s too late.  At our end, we will keep plugging away.  If we’re lucky (and I think we could be) we will be running this show before we get to tech week.  Can you imagine not needing to block a single thing at Wilson?  Can you imagine having the dances learned perfectly before tech week?  And memorization – I mean, come on!  Lyrics and lines will be so memorized by the time we get to Wilson that no one will have to call line.  Can you imagine all of that?  (I mean, yes, adjustments will have to made once we get into our performance space, but that will be so much easier if everything else is in place.)  Good, now let’s make it a reality.  Let’s continue to work hard and to enjoy all the time we have at Cole, because before you know it, we will be in April and then in May, and then NDW will be over for the year.  (Sorry 8th graders.)  Let’s use the time we have to make this our best show yet!  We need to work together, all of us: actors, staff, parents.  But that’s what we excel at.  Are you with me?  On 3: 1, 2, 3 – NDW!!!!!

Until Saturday,

Debbi

Rehearsal #4

I hope everyone is enjoying February break.  Of course, I know that you are all going over your songs and choreography…

This week at NDW there was a lot of music and blocking going on.  I don’t know if all the music has been taught, but if not there must only be one song left to teach.  Also, almost all of the first scene (which is looong) has been blocked.  With many actors on vacation, we are trying to use the vacation weeks for some workshopping and this past week we started with some cast members learning more about fight choreography.

In Robin Hood there are two kinds of fights: sword fighting and quarterstaff fighting.  What is a quarterstaff you ask?  A quarterstaff is a large wooden staff that is used for fighting.  It is most associated with Robin Hood.  In fact, while re-watching my favorite tv show of all time, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, I chuckled as Buffy actually reacts to having to train with a quarterstaff by saying that she’s not “planning on fighting Friar Tuck anytime soon.”   (I just started re-watching within the past two weeks, so this quote is extremely fresh in my brain.)  This week, because I was working with non-Sherwood people, we mostly used just swords.  We talked about different basic sword fighting moves and how to create a fight while still being safe.  Someone always gets injured when we do Robin Hood.  The first time we did this show while I worked at NDW, we were practicing and Friar Tuck accidentally hit Robin Hood with a quarterstaff in his privates.  The last time we did this, the Sheriff accidentally got hit very close to the eye with a sword.  This is why we have to be super careful and why every fight has to be choreographed.  This past Saturday I got hit in the head with a sword and sustained a very small bump.  Hopefully that counts as an injury and no one else will get hit this time around!

My history with fight choreography goes back to my freshman year of college.  I never took a class, but was able to observe some graduate students in their class while working backstage on a show.  The main stage at Brandeis University links to the other theaters in the building.  When you are backstage in one theater, you are on the stage of another.  And so, while hanging out backstage, working crew for Hapgood by Tom Stoppard, I got to watch rehearsals for fight choreography class happening on another stage.  It was really cool.  There were sword fights, quarterstaff fights, and fist fights.  The quarterstaff fight was actually set to a scene from The Matrix and one of the two actors now does fight choreography professionally (and is now married to my theatre arts advisor).  That fight was the best and it was great to watch, but during the final performance of it, one of the guys dropped their quarterstaff.  We had all watched this perfect fight for a whole week and then disaster.  So, it is quite easy to know exactly what you’re doing and still mess up – we just hope that it doesn’t lead to injury.  And it also means that extra concentration must be paid to the craft, even when you think you have it down pat.

Hopefully I’ll get to work with some others on fight choreography this coming Saturday.  And if not, anyone involved in a fight in this show will still get the opportunity to learn about fight choreography just by doing it.

So enjoy your vacation and these randomly summer-like days and I will see you all soon.

-Debbi

Rehearsal #3

Well, it's official - I have "Come to the Fair" stuck in my head and probably will until mid-May.  Hopefully you have some songs stuck in your head, too.  After all, if I heard Jane correctly, there are only 2 songs that have not been taught yet, which means that the majority of songs have been and there are plenty of choices for which one could be stuck in your head!

This week, in the midst of singing, dancing, and trying on costumes we started blocking the first scene.  The first scene is a long one.  We actually have a few really long scenes in this show.  In a world in which people see more film and television than live productions, it's good to remember that a play is written with different rules than a screenplay or a teleplay.  In the latter two, scenes are short by design.  With film/tv, having a long scene takes a lot of work to produce and is generally considered to be boring, unless the director comes up with a really interesting way of shooting it, so scenes are generally designed to be shorter and more quick paced.  In theater, it is the opposite.  This is partly because we can't change locations and settings as easily - that would make scene changes laborious and boring for the audience.  Live theater relishes scene work and stage actors love the rehearsal process.  Not to say that screen actors, don't, but the medium they work in rarely takes advantage of rehearsals, except of course, when there are long scenes.

In our play, although the first scene is long, it can broken into different parts.  The first part is the opening number.  The second part is the noblemen and villagers talking, which ends with David and his family leaving for Sherwood Forest.  This then segues into the third part, which is our introduction to Sherwood and Robin's merry band.  The introduction of Friar Tuck and the fight between him and Robin Hood would be the fourth part, the fifth part starts with the entrance of the Sheriff, Lady Merle, and company, and so on and so forth.  All of these parts are mini scenes which allow for a lot of interesting ways to stage the scene.  

Another long scene is the fair scene, but again, so much happens that there are mini scenes, keeping the audience entertained.  The scene starts with the Sheriff's family, another part of the scene is "Come to the Fair", and yet another part is the archery contest.  These scenes might be long, but they involve a lot of people (if not all of them), and also feature a good amount of character introductions and/or plot.

What all of this means for our actors is that while blocking and rehearsing this scene there could be a lot of downtime while waiting for your mini-scene to come up.  It also means that we can divide and conquer, having actors go in all directions, working on song, or dance, or blocking, without missing a beat.  It's good to have options!

Generally speaking, a visitor to one of NDW rehearsal's would not know where to go first.  Something's always going on the gym.  Often there's something going on in the middle and/or back room.  And then of course there is something going on at all times in the costume room and with set building and in the NDW office.  It takes a village to put on a production and our actors do their part (the most important part I think).  This experience is so different from tech week when we're basically in the auditorium the whole time (for the most part) fixing and running the show.  Putting on a musical never gets boring and keeps everyone on their toes, that's for sure.

For those of you going on vacation, have a great time, but don't forget to practice your songs and your dances!  (That goes for everyone!)

See you on Saturday,

Debbi

Rehearsal #2

This week at Natick Drama Workshop we continued working on music and choreography.  Once we get into blocking, I don’t get to see our actors working on other aspects of the show, so it was nice for me to walk around and see what our actors were up to (and get a sneak peak at a couple of costumes).  As I mentioned last week, it’s really important to continually practice all choreography and to learn lyrics to songs that have been taught – it will make everything so much easier as rehearsals go on and as we get closer to our off-book dates and, eventually, tech week.

I also got to spend some time with about half our cast, talking about stage directions and doing some preliminary character work.  What do I mean by stage direction? Each part of the stage has a different name, making it easier to give an actor precise blocking.   If a director just said, “You enter over there, walk that way, and end up over there,” well, that’s rather confusing.  However, by saying, “You enter upstage left and cross right to the pit platform,” well now you know exactly what the director is asking of you. 

Stage right vs. stage left
Even as someone who has been involved in theater since kindergarten (and directing since college), this can still trip me up, but I am also directionally challenged.  It’s actually not that hard – as long as you know your right from your left.  The tricky part is knowing your right from your left and where you are standing in relation to the stage.  Stage right and left are the right and left of the actor ON stage.  As the director, I am usually facing the stage and therefore my right and left are the opposite of stage right and left.  Let me say this again: stage right and stage left are based on the actor’s right and left while on stage.  Think about it – if you’re an actor and the director tells you to move left, all you do is move left.  It’s that simple.

However, house right and house left (house=auditorium/audience) is the opposite of all this.  What?  Now I’m confused.  I know, I know, but this is still from the actor’s perspective.  If an actor is in the house (and presumably facing the stage), the actor’s right is house right and the actor’s left is house left.  The confusing part is that house right is on the same side as stage left.  If an actor enters from aisle (or loge) right and continues onto the stage, the perspective changes.  Even though the actor walked in a straight line up onto the stage from aisle right, once that actor is on the stage (and presumably facing the audience), the actor’s right and left are opposite of what they were when that same actor was facing the stage.  Because, again, now the actor is ON stage.  This is the part that I think always trips people up.  But once you get it, you get it.

Down stage vs. up stage
Time for a history lesson.  Way back, a long time ago, in a land far away, stages used to be tilted.  This way, the audience, who would all be sitting at the same level, would be able to see things happening at the back of the stage, as well as things happening at the front of the stage.  The back end of the stage was, therefore, up, compared to the front of the stage, which was down.  So if an actor needed to move from the front to the back, he was literally walking “up” stage and an actor walking from the back to front was literally going “down” stage.  If you think about a tilted stage, you’ll never get these two stage directions mixed up again.

Center stage
Do I really need to explain this one? No, I didn’t think so.

In order to help teach this I’ve taken to having actors go stand in one of 9 spots that the stage is divided into to help make all of this more visual for other actors.   Those 9 spots are up right, up center, up left, stage right, center stage, stage left, down right, down center, and down left. 

Once that is made clear, then I start getting more complicated with actors standing in aisle right or left and loge right or left (at Wilson there on loges on either side, at Kennedy there is only a right loge), in the pit, and on the down right and down left extensions.  The step after learning this would be learning how to write stage directions, but we didn’t get into that today.  When we start blocking next week we will get into that for any actors who are new or need a refresher.

The other thing I did with some actors, as I mentioned, was start character work.  It’s really important for actors to understand their characters.  Sometimes this means creating a backstory.  For example, why our soldiers are soldiers (rather than farmers, for example).  Sometimes it requires the actors to focus on their characters’ motivations and wants.  All of this depends on the actors’ experiences.  One of our 8th grade actors named her character’s motivation right off the bat, whereas one 6th grade actor had already come up with a backstory and discussed it with an actor that he would be sharing all his scenes with.  Some actors don’t know to think about either of these things and that’s why it’s good to discuss all of this in a group setting – who better to learn from than your fellow actors?  Much of this is based on the script, but there are holes to fill in and choices to be made.  Any actor could decide that his or her character is always really excited about everything, which may or may not make sense with the script.  If the actor can justify it, why not go for it.  The worst thing that could happen is that the director will ask you to try it another way.  After all, even though the characters are in the hands of the actors, the entire play is created from the vision of the director based on how she interprets the script.  Just another way in which, as Jane likes to put it, “theater is a team sport.”

Well, that’s it for now.  See you all Saturday,

Debbi

Read-thru/Rehearsal #1

We have officially started working on Robin Hood!  There were kids singing and dancing this past weekend at the Cole Center.  Actors began to learn the opening number of the show and some even began some work on another dance, while our younger actors were busy singing with Jane. 

In between all the dancing and singing was our read-thru.  For the first time our actors got to go through the script, read their lines, and hear what everyone sounds like together as a cast.  Of course, the kids were just excited to get their scripts, but I personally love the read-thru.  For the first time you get to see how the show is going to end up.  Of course, we were missing several actors (mostly for Junior Districts - I hope you all did well), which meant that Kiva and I spent a lot of time talking to ourselves as we each “played” several characters.  Despite that, it went well and I can’t wait to start doing character work and blocking with everyone.

You may wonder why we don’t start with blocking.  It’s simple actually:  because we are working on a musical, it is more crucial for music and choreography to get started sooner.  These can be seamlessly worked into the blocking and take a lot of practice.  When I do show, musical or not, I work on my lines and picture my blocking in my head.  Blocking isn’t something I generally “practice” on my own (unless it is more complicated, like fight choreography, which is hard to do by yourself anyways).  I can go through my lines and think about blocking in my head.  However, when I am working on a musical number, I need to actively practice the dance moves in order to learn them.  I remember being in Natick Drama Workshop and practicing all the choreography in my bedroom.  I’d put on the tape that Jane made for all of us and dance and sing along.  For some reason, muscle memory works differently when it comes to choreography (maybe that’s just me?).  I need to physically get up and dance to review and learn the moves.  If you’ve ever seen a dancer or cheerleader practice moves you know that it doesn’t have to be done full out, but it must be done.  This is the only way to really get it into your head.

As for the songs, it’s not just about learning the lyrics.  You must know the tune and practice your pitch, and there is also rhythm to consider.  These are things that can’t be practiced in your head and must be practiced with music (which is why Jane has already made audio recordings of all the songs for you).  If you don’t have access to the music, please still practice the songs, but if you’re unsure of how a part sounds, just ask about it at the next rehearsal, or review with music once you again have access.  Of course, without music you can still learn the lyrics!  If you mumble through your songs, or if different people are singing different words at the same time the audience can tell.

Another thing to consider is that music and choreography go hand in hand.  Let’s say that you are practicing a dance in your house in between rehearsals.  Chances are, you are playing the music while doing so.  Even if you aren’t concentrating on the lyrics and on singing, just hearing the song will help get it into your head.  Likewise, there may be certain moves that correspond with certain words that you are either listening for, or noticing, as you go along.  This will help you learn your lyrics.  The reverse of that, of course, is that the sooner you know your songs and lyrics, the easier it will be to learn your choreography because some of the moves will correspond to certain lyrics.  I don’t know which is easier to learn first, lyrics or choreography – I think it’s different for everyone, but either way, they definitely go together.

When it comes to blocking and the acting part of putting on a musical (although you would certainly be acting and in character for all of your songs and dances), it’s not that it’s less important, but rather, something that takes less obvious effort in certain ways.  Making that last statement feels untrue, as acting classes I took in college were my hardest because I had to put so much effort into them, but there was always less homework to do, which is maybe an easier way to explain the difference.  Acting requires effort; song and dance requires effort and homework (but the fun kind).

Please, please, please start practicing what you’ve already learned and re-read the script this week – it’s never too early to get going on memorization.

See you Saturday,

Debbi

Auditions

Well, by now you’ve all seen the cast list and I can’t wait for scripts to be handed out on Saturday for our read thru and first rehearsal!  Robin Hood is one of my favorite shows and I am beyond thrilled to be able to work on it again with our current group of NDW actors.

Speaking of our actors, they brought it to auditions.  In fact, we had a really hard time casting the show because we have so much talent in our group!  So what do you do, as a director, when you have to find parts for multiple actors who are talented enough to play just about any role?  This is the challenge that faces us every time we cast a show, but this time around was really difficult for some reason.

For any casting session, the director’s job is not only to find the best actor for a particular role, but also the best combination of actors.  At NDW, because everyone who auditions automatically gets a role, it’s also about finding a role that will help each actor shine.  It’s quite the puzzle to put together.  Sometimes we have to consider things other than pure talent, like do these two actors look like they could be a couple, or will these two actors work well together?  Sometimes, it doesn’t matter, but sometimes, depending on the actors, it is something that we have to consider before we make any cast list official.  Thinking this way also allows us to figure out what to do with actors who could play any role.  It helps us narrow things down and find the best part for the actor and vice versa.

Let’s say you have 4 actors that could easily play any of the main roles (they can all sing, act, and dance).  How do you figure out which actor to put in which role?  If we were casting Bye Bye Birdie, for example, maybe all of our actresses could easily play Kim, Rosie, Ursula, and Mae Peterson.   Maybe, even though they are all talented, a couple of them may look more mature than the other two.  Those two would then be considered for Rosie and Mae Peterson and not Kim or Ursula.  Let’s say that Conrad Birdie and Hugo Peabody have already been cast.  Does one of the younger looking girls work better with those two actors?  Does one of them look better standing next to the actor playing Hugo?  If so, that actress could be best cast as Kim.  For the two more mature actresses, which one would be better paired with the Albert Peterson actor?  Rosie is his girlfriend and Mae his mother, so how the two actresses interact with this actor matters.   Sometimes though, it comes down to a feeling.  If you’re trying to cast a girlfriend or a mother, who of the two contending actresses seems like she would be best to lay a guilt trip on someone?  Does one look more matronly than the other?  All of these things, and more (like personality), need to be considered when casting.

Sometimes, when an actor could be considered for multiple roles you have to create multiple casts and figure out which one feels better in the end.  Often in doing this, you find yourself playing musical chairs on paper:  If Actor A plays Conrad Birdie, than Actress B will play Kim and Actress C will play Rosie.  But if Actor D is playing Conrad, then Actress B would be Rosie and Actress C would play Kim.  This is a much less complicated version of what we do during casting (and with over 70 actors).

One other thing we have to consider when casting is that NDW is a workshop.  This means that we strive really hard to cast actors where they fit and not where they will fail.  Sometimes this means that we cast an actor a certain way to help him or her grow.  There have been many shows where we cast someone in a serious role, when in the past they’ve only done comedic roles, and vice versa.  In fact, I remember the first time I worked on this show with NDW we cast Jane Raithel’s daughter (who was an 8th grader) in the role of Salome because she had just done a more serious role and we wanted to see her do something lighter – we knew she had a comedic side and we were right.  (Quick disclaimer: Jane never took part in casting her own children and we didn’t have a choreographer that show, so it was just Cindy and I making that particular decision.)

I’d like to think that when the cast list goes up no one makes any judgments about their roles until the read thru, but I know that is not always the case.  Even after the read thru, some actors think that because they only have lines in certain scenes, that means that those are the only scenes they are in.  Not so!  Back to my first point though, it’s hard to grasp your role when it isn’t one of the “main” characters.  Robin Hood is a story that dates back to the middle ages and most people are familiar with certain characters (Robin Hood, Maid Marion, Little John, the Sheriff, for example) and think that if they are not playing one of these characters that they don’t matter.  That is never the case.  And in the case of Robin Hood, our play is just one interpretation of a story that has been retold several times over, so you really do have to wait until you get your script to see how characters you may not be familiar with fit into the story.  There is so much going on in this play and I think you will all really enjoy it and be happy with your roles.  Plus – we get to do fight choreography!

So, having said all that – I can’t wait to share this story with you on Saturday and start rehearsing.

See you all at 8:55 Saturday morning,

Debbi

To prepare for auditions

Hello everyone and welcome back to Natick Drama Workshop!  This blog is an edited version of something I posted at the end of the summer.  If you read it back then I strongly suggest reading it again before Saturday!

In a little under a week we will be back at NDW for the spring show and I thought that perhaps it would be helpful to write up some audition tips to help both our new and returning actors get ready for our spring musical (no, I can't tell you what we're doing, but you will be happy).

Tip #1: Have the right attitude.  Smile and be polite.  
What does that have to do with acting?  Nothing really, but whenever you audition, interview, or are trying to make a first impression you should always make people think that you want to be where you are and that you're happy and excited.  If you get nervous it helps to remember this, so that you can get over some of your nerves by acting like you're happy.  And when you smile, your mood can change!
Cindy, Lisa, Jane, and I notice when you look unhappy or when you're not polite.  So put your best face forward, behave and say please and thank you!
*In the fall there were a few 8th graders who did not do this and it did affect how we cast.  I'm not telling you this to call anyone out, but rather to encourage everyone to remember that how you present yourself during auditions matters.  In the fall the attitude presented by these people filtered down to the rest of their auditions.  That is why this is #1 on my list!

Tip #2: Smile while dancing and keep on moving.  
This one sounds like the last one, but is more specific.  When you do the dance audition you might not remember all the moves, or you might mess up, or maybe you just aren't the best dancer.  That' okay.  What we want to see is someone who can move and act their way through the dance combinations.  Obviously it helps to be able to dance, but it's not completely necessary to have a good dance audition.  Pretend that you are at your dance recital and smile like your grandparents are watching and then relax.  Do your best and don't freak out or lose the smile if you mess up.  Sometimes we see someone who doesn't do all the dance moves, but keeps smiling and bopping along and we know that there's something we can do with that person that will feature him/her.  Plus, it means you have a good attitude and that is a must for all theater endeavors!
*Additionally, think about it this way - during the performance what do you do if you suddenly forget part of a dance?  You don't just stand there looking miserable.  You keep on smiling and do something subtle until you can pick up the dance again.  Think of your audition like a performance and improv your way through it if necessary.  Of course, by the first performance I know this would never be an issue because you've been practicing your dances for months...

Tip #3: Act your song and sing it loud and proud.  
While I'm being specific, let's talk about the music audition, which tends to be the scariest.  When I was in NDW it was the scariest part for me, too.  Believe it or not, I was a quiet kid and didn't always project during my singing auditions (which our "new" musical director, Jane, can attest to), but I wish I did.  Here's the thing - your signing audition is also an acting audition so we need to hear you, even if you're off key.  We also need to see you do more than just stand there with your arms at your side or crossed in front of you.  We know your nervous and that's okay, but please do your best to show us that you care.  What is the song about?  Can you put in a dance move or a gesture that will show us that you're invested?  Can you assume a character or an attitude to help get the point of the song across?  At the very least - smile!  And don't forget to project.
Tip #3a: Sing by yourself.   Yes, you are allowed to sing in a small group of 2 or 3, but sometimes that means that we can't hear you at all.  If you are in 7th or 8th grade, specifically, just try to sing by yourself.  That way, it is easier for us to cast you whether you are the best singer in the cast, the worst, or somewhere in between.  

*I would like to add a non-theater story here.  Despite having done musical theater since elementary school, I was really nervous the first time I did karaoke by myself.  I picked "Goodbye Earl" by the Dixie Chicks as my first song and was literally shaking from the time the song started to the end.  How did I get through it?  Well, I acted the song out as I went.  I turned it into a story and I smiled.  Now, I'm much better at doing karaoke because I got my jitters out by acting and hamming it up.  Why don't you see if you can act through your nerves as well?

Tip #4: Make choices and commit to them 100%.  
When you act you have to make choices.  We go over this at auditions, but sometimes I'm not sure everyone understands.  And more importantly, this isn't just for the acting audition.  It is also for singing and dancing, but I will speak here about making choices in terms of the acting audition.  You need to decide what to do.  How will you say a line?  Is there a word that you want to emphasize more than another?  How will you use your face?  What gestures or body language should be used to convey your choice?  Do you need to use a certain tone or inflection with your voice?  As an actor this is all up to you.  During the rehearsal process the directors help with these choices, but during an audition it is for the actor to make decisions in a way that will help to showcase his or her individual talents.
The worst thing you can do is nothing.  In doing nothing you are making the choice to show us that you don't care.  Now maybe you are shy or don't know how to make certain choices - fine.  That is totally understandable, but if you don't try something your audition falls flat and it becomes very hard to cast you in the correct role.  It is better to try something, commit to it 100% and have it fail, than to make the choice to do nothing.
*Remember how I mentioned that some 8th graders didn't do so great with #1?  Well those same actors didn't do so well with this one either.  They chose to not have great attitudes and that was the entirety of their auditions.  The two are always connected.

Tip #5: How you stand matters.
I've already talked about presenting yourself and making a good first impression, but I haven't mentioned stance specifically.  Unless you are making a character choice (see above) you should be standing up straight.  No slouching, no leaning, no going back and forth from foot to foot.  This isn't easy because we are all hardwired to fidget, especially in situations that make us nervous.  This is something you can practice on your own.  In your room stand with your feet shoulder-width apart and plant your feet (actually imagine that they are planted or superglued to the ground).  Put your hands by your side and have a conversation with your imaginary friend (or better, invite a friend over and you can have someone to talk to and call you out on your fidgeting).  Once you've mastered this you can try standing like different characters and practice what it feels like to slouch on purpose!

Tip #6: Enunciate!
When you are speaking, whether as part of your acting audition or when you're introducing yourself to us, make sure you can be understood!  Speak clearly and slowly.  Make sure we hear your consonants!  

On that note I leave you.  I look forward to seeing you all at auditions.  Good luck!

-Debbi

Almost There!

Well, here we are, a week and half away from tech week.  Can you believe it?  I certainly can't.  In fact, I might be in denial...

Tech week is a lot of fun, which is funny because it's also a lot of work and really tiring.  Unfortunately, the amount of fun and the amount of work go hand in hand.  For example, if all of our tech rehearsals are amazing (everyone remembers their lines, lyrics, choreography, and blocking, allowing us to add layers to your performance, rather than fix things) this tech week could be the most fun ever.  However, if tech rehearsals are not so great (lots of lines missing, not a lot of improv to cover it up, choreography's a mess, etc.) you will not be having as much fun as you could be having.  Yes, this applies to the staff as well, but it mostly applies to you, the actor.

So in preparation for tech week what should you be doing?  Basically, the same stuff you've been doing, or should be doing:

1) Know your lines.  This week you have to be off book for most of Act 2.   That's in addition to all of Act 1.  Just because you are concentrating on memorizing these new scenes doesn't mean that you should stop practicing your old scenes.  All scenes are equally important and your brain is a muscle that must be exercised.

2) Know more than your lines.  What?  I know, it's a lot of work, but you can't memorize just your lines. You should know the lines before yours (these are your cue lines).  Side note: speaking of cue lines, understand that all of your lines are cue lines, but the most important cue lines you have are right before musical numbers.  Jane will be listening for these and therefore these are maybe the most important lines to get exactly right. You should also know what's going on in all of your scenes.  You probably think, I know what happens, but do you?  Let's say that you're waiting to come on stage and no one on stage is talking.  What do you do?  Well, first you wait to see if the people onstage can figure it out, but if they don't it's up to you.  I don't mean that you're backstage whispering lines, hoping that the people onstage will hear you.  I mean that you need to enter and help out your fellow actors (your teammates).  What happens if you're waiting to come on and the actors onstage skip your entrance?  You need to know everything around your entrance so you can still come on and say your lines or do your expected blocking.

Okay, now what happens if you are onstage and no one is saying a line?  Do you know what the conversation that's supposed to be happening is about?  Can you improv a line that makes sense and gets the scene rolling again without anyone panicking?  This is why you need to know more than just your lines.  Things happen in live theater, sometimes these things have nothing to do with actors.   For all you know, I could fall asleep at the back of the house and not cue the curtain to open or the lights to go on, but still, the show must go on!  (Don't worry - I wouldn't do that to you.)  Sometimes these things are easy to work around, sometimes they aren't, but the more you know, and the more prepared you are, simply by knowing the whole script and story (and not just what affects you specifically), the better you will be able to handle whatever comes your way when you are in front of an audience.

3) Know your lyrics and music.  Yes, this is kind of like knowing your lines, but you have to really know the music to know when to sing your lyrics.  You need to know the rhythm of the song.  You need to know which verse comes first, second, third.  We are, after all, putting on a musical.  The people are coming for the music just as much as they are for everything else (yes, I know, most people are coming to see you, but that doesn't mean that they aren't expecting a musical). I'm not the music director, so I can't speak to all of this, but I can tell you that's it a lot harder to improv your way through a forgotten song than a forgotten scene.

4) Know your choreography.  Honestly, if you don't know your dance moves you look sloppy and that can ruin the show - I kid you not.  If everyone's doing different things, or if only a couple people are doing all the moves, your audience will know that you don't know your stuff.  If you know your lyrics to the point where they become an extension of you, I promise that the choreography will be easier to learn.  And what's more, when your choreography becomes muscle memory for you, the lyrics will be easier to remember.  Ah, the circle of life...  Seriously though, it's true.  #3 and #4 on this list go hand in hand.  

5) Know your blocking.  You knew this one was coming, right?  It's last on the list solely because this will hopefully get learned as you go over your lines and as you work in rehearsal.  This is also one of the toughest things for NDW kids because our rehearsal space is completely different from our performance space.  I remember when I worked at North Shore Music Theatre.  It was an eye opening experience to see what a professional theatre did.  They also had a different rehearsal space, but it was theirs and they were able to mark it up.  If there was a platform, there would be tape on the floor indicating that.  At NDW for us to do that would take too much set up and clean up time before and after each rehearsal (not to mention a huge waste of tape).  And for a show like this, it might still be confusing because of the ramps.  We can mark them on the floor, but you still have to remember when you're going under them, which you can't do if they're just marked on the floor.  So it's extra important for you to know your blocking.  When we get to Kennedy, if you know where you're coming from you can figure out where you are actually coming from (or going), but if you don't it will be a mess.

Now, we have 2 Saturday rehearsals left and only a couple of scenes to block.  Your rehearsal time is there for you to rehearse and practice all the things that you need to practice to have a good show and tech week.  That doesn't mean you don't have to put your own time into this show, but the more you pay attention and work during rehearsals, the easier it will be for you to practice on your own (or at the lunch table with NDW friends) and the better your tech rehearsals will be. 

And they are your tech rehearsals, so make the most of them.

See you Saturday,

Debbi

Memorizing Lines

Hi Folks!

This isn't really a blog, so much as a passing along of information.  Today I stumbled upon some tricks for memorizing lines from Pioneer Drama (you know, the company where many of our musicals come from).  Since I know that everyone at home is working on this I wanted to share the Pioneer blog with you.  It can be found here.

Enjoy and see you all Saturday for our first off-book date!

-Debbi

Rehearsals 2 and 3

We accomplished a lot at Natick Drama Workshop this week!  Almost all of the music has been taught, our opening songs have been choreographed, and we blocked the first 4 scenes of the show!

What does that mean for our actors?  It means that from here on out there will always be “homework.”  It is really important that each actor goes home and “studies” what’s been learned during rehearsals.

I remember being in NDW as a kid and practicing my dances over and over.  Jane used to make cassette tapes for us and I would put the tape into my stereo system during the week and practice ALL the choreography that I learned.  The tape had 2 sides: one had vocals (Jane singing along), and the other side was just the accompaniment. When I was trying to concentrate on just the dance moves, I would listen to the side with Jane singing.  I would sing along, but I didn’t have to think about the lyrics until I was ready.   Then, after going over the dances a couple of times, I’d flip the tape over and dance while singing.

Practicing these things is really important.  From a staff/teacher perspective, it’s really frustrating when you teach something and then you have to re-teach it every week.  By practicing, you are ensuring that we won’t be wasting time re-teaching (although certainly we want to answer any questions you have so that you don’t learn things incorrectly over and over).  From an acting perspective, the more you practice, the more comfortable you will be onstage during the performances.

Imagine this: you are an actor with a smaller role and you memorized your 10 lines and you figure that’s all you really need to worry about.  During the shows you plan to sing quietly and have managed to get spots at the back of the stage during all the dances so that you won’t be seen.  This way, you don’t have to worry about learning the lyrics or choreography and you’re all set.  Except that you’re not.  Your parents, friends, grandparents will find you on stage and will be watching you not knowing what you’re doing.  You could also throw off your fellow actors.  By not knowing what you’re doing you risk getting hurt or hurting someone else (an extreme, but not impossible).  At best, you might throw off someone’s concentration or confidence when they see you doing something other than what they are doing.  And, worst of all, your fellow actors, once they catch on to you, will realize that you don’t care and are not a member of the team.  The entire cast is a team and each member needs to do what’s expected of them so that the team can stay whole and continue to work together.

It may seem tedious to go home every day after school (and whatever afternoon activities you may have) and do homework, and then have to work on this show, but your effort will pay off and you can do this homework with the aid of friends, and you’ll feel a lot more confident at rehearsals and, ultimately, during the shows.  It’s a win-win.

So, when we ask you to read the entire script, or review your blocking, or choreography, or to start memorizing your lyrics – do it!  It is for your own good and for the good of your team.  The more you do all of this, the happier you will be at NDW – I promise!

-Debbi

Read-through and Rehearsal #1

We are off and running!  There were actors singing and dancing all over Cole this past Saturday.  Songs have been learned, dance moves have been reviewed, and soon, before you know it, we’ll have a show.

The first thing we did this week was hand out scripts to our actors and had our read-through.  “What’s a read-through?,” you ask.  Well, all the actors sit in a circle and read the script out loud.  It’s the first time that the actors speak their lines, but it’s also the first time that the cast gets to hear others speak their lines.  One thing I love about the read-through is seeing who is already in character.  Usually, the 8th graders step up.  Many of our actors take this seriously (as they all should) and really get into it.  Shout outs to Jessica, Ryan, and Rebecca for already being in character, although they weren’t the only ones.

Now actors are asked to re-read their scripts.  The more familiar an actor is with the entire show, the better rehearsals will go and the more each individual part will make sense.  For example, in reading just your own lines, you aren’t seeing how your character could be interacting with other characters and actors.  Who else is on stage in your scene?  What just happened before you entered?  All of these things affect your character. 

In life this is true, too.  Let’s say you walk into your classroom just as the bell rings and your teacher seems angry.  You might think the teacher is mad at you for not being in your seat as the bell rings, or you might just think that your teacher is having a bad day.  Now, as a person, you don’t know what happened before, but maybe if you knew that a student walked in, knocked the teacher’s coffee all over himself and the floor and then yelled at the teacher, rather than taking responsibility, you would react differently than if the teacher just really hates it when students aren’t in their desks when the bell rings.

In this case, you don’t have the script and you can only react to what you’re given.  However, in a play, you do have the script.  As a character, perhaps you are still clueless, but as an actor you have more power by knowing the whole story.  If you are a fairy tale character you know that at some point in the story things get messed up and nothing happens like it’s supposed to.  This is important information.  As a character you are only concerned with what’s going wrong in your own story, but as an actor you know to be in a certain place so that Jack and Jill can have their moment to show what’s wrong, just as they know to move aside for your character when the time comes.  You also know that there are things that happened offstage to your characters that the audience doesn’t get to see.  You, as an actor, get to use your imagination to fill in those gaps (within reason) and make character choices based on what you decide.  For example, how did Mary and Little Bo Peep’s sheep get lost/mixed-up?  What happened off-stage that we didn’t see?  As an actor you need to know the whole story from both sides and then pretend to know only what your character knows when onstage.

Boy, this acting can be a lot of work.  But, it’s fun work.  Just like school there’s homework: you have to know the play and reread it several times, memorize lines, blocking, lyrics, choreography, and make-up back stories.  But it’s worth it.  Acting can be the hardest thing you’ll ever do, but it can also be the most rewarding.

See you Saturday,

Debbi

Auditions

Hi everyone!  Great job at auditions Saturday.  I say this every show, but I really love watching our cast audition.  I always learn a little something new about our returning actors and it’s a great introduction to our brand new actors.

For this show, casting went by really quickly, in part because our cast gave us a lot to work with and showed us (the staff) what each individual brings to the table, so to speak.  When casting there are always so many things to consider, which is why I always say that casting is like a jigsaw puzzle.  The directors have to line up the actors in the roles in a way that fits, not just for each individual actor, but also for the whole show. 

For example, we usually have a few actors that could pull off each role.  But we can’t cast 3 people in each role – that wouldn’t work at all.  So we have to figure out combinations of people and see what works and what makes sense.  Sometimes, in order to do this, we have to change casting that we thought we had already figured out in order to make something else work that wouldn’t otherwise.  This is the tricky part, but in the end, I think we usually do a good job.

Let’s say that you are going to cast Mickey Mouse and his friends as characters in a production of Robin Hood.  How are you going to go about this? 

First, these are the roles that you need to cast:
Robin Hood
Little John
Will Scarlett
Friar Tuck
Maid Marian
Sheriff of Nottingham

Second, here are your actors:
Mickey Mouse
Minnie Mouse
Goofy
Donald Duck
Chip
Dale

You might think that Mickey is going to be Robin Hood, but maybe he did a really good audition for the Sheriff of Nottingham, too.  And then perhaps you would want Goofy to be Robin Hood.  You have to think about all the possibilities.  Perhaps, after doing this your casting possibilities look like this:

Robin Hood – Mickey, Donald, Goofy, Dale, Minnie
Little John – Goofy, Mickey
Will Scarlet – Chip, Dale, Minnie, Donald, Mickey
Friar Tuck – Mickey, Chip, Dale
Maid Marian – Minnie
Sheriff of Nottingham – Donald, Mickey, Goofy Chip

Now you have to narrow it down.  Since Minnie is the only one that you, as the director, see as Maid Marian you can take her out of the running for everything else.  You also see that only Goofy or Mickey could be Little John.  Mickey is listed as a possibility for all the parts, but Goofy is only listed for 3 roles, so in order to figure that out you need to decide which you’d rather see for that role.  After you think about that you need to make sure that there is still a part for the other person that makes sense.  So I think our director would probably write down Goofy’s name for Little John, but only in pencil, just in case the director changes his/her mind.  That leaves us with this:

Robin Hood – Mickey, Donald, Dale
Little John – Goofy
Will Scarlet – Chip, Dale, Donald, Mickey
Friar Tuck – Mickey, Chip, Dale
Maid Marian – Minnie
Sheriff of Nottingham – Donald, Mickey, Chip

Okay, so now what?  I think it’s important to look at the villainous character, because not everyone can pull off being the villain.  The director thinks about the possibilities (Donald, Mickey, and Chip) and realizes 2 things: 1) Mickey has a hard time not smiling, even though he did have a really good audition, and 2) Chip is a newer actor who did an okay audition, but maybe isn’t ready for such a big role.  However, the director isn’t quite ready to cross Mickey’s name off the list, so this role is now between Donald and Mickey.  That means that Chip has to be either Will Scarlet or Friar Tuck.  Thinking about what Chip brings to the table, the director decides that Chip would be a really good Friar Tuck because he shows the ability to be both serious and funny.  Now your cast list looks like this:

Robin Hood – Mickey, Donald, Dale
Little John – Goofy
Will Scarlet –Dale, Donald, Mickey
Friar Tuck –Chip
Maid Marian – Minnie

Sheriff of Nottingham – Donald or Mickey

Now, of the remaining 3 roles, Donald or Mickey could be any, but Dale is only listed as Robin Hood or Will Scarlet.  So now there are a couple possibilities based on how we place Dale:

Possibility #1
Robin Hood –Dale
Little John – Goofy
Will Scarlet –Donald or Mickey
Friar Tuck –Chip
Maid Marian – Minnie

Sheriff of Nottingham – Donald or Mickey

Possibility #2
Robin Hood – Mickey or Donald
Little John – Goofy
Will Scarlet –Dale
Friar Tuck –Chip
Maid Marian – Minnie

Sheriff of Nottingham – Donald or Mickey

With Possibility #1 you are left with Mickey and Donald as Will Scarlet and the Sheriff.  You don’t mind that, but both are really good actors and Will Scarlet isn’t as big a role as Robin Hood.  But Dale would make a really good Robin Hood.

With Possibility #2 you are left with the hero and the villain role for Mickey and Donald.  From there this becomes much easier as you know that Donald would be a great Sheriff (and you could make the role a bit more comedic) and there was never a doubt that Mickey would make a wonderful Robin Hood.

However, what makes sense for Dale?  Is he ready for a leading role? Are there any benefits to seeing him as Will Scarlett over Robin Hood?  Or in having him play Robin Hood over Will Scarlett?

This now comes down to a couple of things.  One – Possibility #2, with the added commentary above, does make a lot of sense to you and the cast seems to be rounded out.

Possibility #2
Robin Hood – Mickey
Little John – Goofy
Will Scarlet –Dale
Friar Tuck –Chip
Maid Marian – Minnie
Sheriff of Nottingham – Donald

Possibility #1, on the other hand, will allow an actor who had a good audition a chance to shine, and can focus on other aspects of Mickey and Donald’s talents:

Possibility #1
Robin Hood –Dale
Little John – Goofy
Will Scarlet –Donald
Friar Tuck –Chip
Maid Marian – Minnie
Sheriff of Nottingham –Mickey

Mickey rarely gets to play the bad guy, and if he could just stop smiling so much… but maybe he could smile evilly… he could be great.  And Donald can be really funny.  Giving him the role of Will Scarlet will give him the chance to be comedic, a second banana, if you will.

When considering all these things, the director decides to take a chance on Dale as Robin Hood.  It might not be what people expect, but it allows certain actors the chance to try something new and hopefully shine at it.  And since Robin Hood always ends up with Maid Marian, you know that Dale and Minnie are good friends who will work well together, but they are just acting.  At the end of the day, it is still Mickey and Minnie forever with a big heart.

So you see, there are several things to consider.  And the end result of both possible casts will work, as long as the director has faith in his/her actors.

Do you agree with my Robin Hood casting?  If not, tell me why (I am curious).

Next up, the read through!  Be glad Donald Duck won’t be around – he spits a lot!

See you all on Saturday,
Debbi